Seamless Gutters

by seamlessgutterstoday.com on 07/27/2012 - 09:39 am |

Tags: Seamless Gutters

Seamless Gutters

For starters consider how the seamless gutters will be attached to your home? Older gutters were typically attached with spikes and ferrules. It is very commonplace to see the heads of the spikes protruding from the gutters – not very attractive. Seamless gutters today are installed with aluminum inside hidden hangers attached with a stainless steel screw. The curb appeal of the house is greatly enhanced, and the gutters are much more secure. The spike heads pop out due to the weight of debris, snow, and/or ice that accumulates forcing the gutter to pull loose. This is not the case with the screwed in hidden hanger. 


What about the thickness of the seamless gutter material? The best aluminum seamless gutters are made using aluminum that is .032 inch thick, which is sturdy enough to resist bending or denting if a ladder is set against it. 


Aluminum seamless gutters today are available in two common sizes: 5 inch or 6 inch. Most houses have 5 inch gutters. A 6 inch seamless gutter can handle more water before overflowing. However, a 6 inch gutter also requires some preplanning. The fascia or gutter board behind the gutter needs to be sized correctly. Also keep in mind that while it can handle more water, it is required to because it extend further out from the roof causing to actually catch more rain. Seamless Gutters are intended to handle the water running off the roof, not the water falling from the sky. Also most builders install a 1x6 gutter board. This works well for 5 inch gutters. 6 inch gutter must have a 1x8 gutter board. Without it, the bottom of the gutter can extend below the bottom of the gutter board. This often looks very awkward and is not as secure. 


Downspouts come in two common sizes: 2 x 3 inches and 3 x 4 inches. Downspouts depend entirely on gravity to function. A 2 x 3 inch downspout can typically handle the average rainfall from approximately 600 square feet of roof area. A 3 x 4 inch downspout will handle the rainfall from 1,200 square feet of roof. Avoid trying to empty one long gutter at one end with a single downspout. Place a downspout at each end. A 2 x 3 inch downspout is made for 5 inch gutter. The 3 x 4 is for 6 inch gutter. In most instances, 5 inch seamless gutter with an adequate number of 2x3 downspouts is going to get the job done effectively. 


Aluminum will not rust, but, it could corrode. Never place aluminum in contact with another metal such as steel, copper, or tin. Electrolysis will occur and the aluminum will actually be eaten away. Not only that, the chemicals in concrete, stucco, brick mortar, and treated lumber can cause corrosion. You need to isolate the aluminum from these materials with a sheet of rubber or heavy plastic. 


When it comes time to make a decision on seamless gutters, be sure to contact a reputable professional and check references. Be sure to get a written warranty. A good installer will usually provide a lifetime warranty on material and labor. And be cautious of those who use outside contractors because if a problem does occur you don’t want to be caught in the middle of a conflict over who is responsible.


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